London Olympics and beyond: weighing the costs of temporary architecture – latimes.com

The Summer Olympics in London are engulfed in the Pop-Up strategy of temporary venues. Some delightfully pleasing, others not so desirable. But Temporary Urbanism has found a solid place to evolve in events like the Olympics. Helping to solve many economic questions but not particularly planning and urban design solutions to problems. Let’s visit this idea as it finds its way into many cities across the world.

The London Olympics over the next two weeks will offer a high-profile showcase for this kind of architecture. Roughly a third of London’s new venues are temporary. 

Over the last several years and accelerating noticeably since the 2008 economic collapse, a certain kind of unapologetically practical architecture has emerged in cities around the world.

Some of the buildings designed in this hyper-expedient style are meant to be temporary. Others are produced on a shoestring or fill spaces left vacant by the collapse of boom-era plans for grand buildings by world-famous architects.

But is this any way to build a city? Doesn’t this brand of architecture have implications for planning, preservation and urban design that we’ve barely begun to consider?

The London Olympics over the next two weeks will offer a high-profile showcase for this kind of architecture. Roughly a third of London’s new venues are temporary. Another handful, including the swimming and diving hall by Zaha Hadid and the main Olympic stadium by Populous and British architect Peter Cook, are designed to be radically downsized after the games are over.

via London Olympics and beyond: weighing the costs of temporary architecture – latimes.com.

London 2012 Olympic cauldron by Thomas Heatherwick

The recently unveiled Cauldron at the Summer Olympics is a wonderful and beautiful tribute to the Olympics. But oddly enough, cannot be viewed by most of the public that will visit the Olympic Park. I’m not sure why this design decision was made but it is very unfortunate. I personally believe it is one of the most beautiful Cauldron designs ever.

Dezeen Wire: here are the first images of the London 2012 Olympic Cauldron designed by Thomas Heatherwick, unveiled at the opening ceremony of the games tonight.

The cauldron consists of 204 copper petals, each representing one of the competing nations. They were brought into the stadium by each team as part of the athletes’ procession then attached to long pipes in a ring at the centre of the arena.

via London 2012 Olympic cauldron by Thomas Heatherwick.

Edmund Sumner photographs London 2012 Olympic architecture

I am following much of the Summer Games in London but I am mostly impressed with some of the exciting and beautiful architecture that has been created to house the many sporting events and the Olympic Village housing the athletes.

Check out how architecture has set the tone for the drama and beauty that backdrops the human spirit and athleticism of this years Summer Games in London.

Ahead of the London 2012 Olympics opening on Friday, here’s a slideshow of images from photographer Edmund Sumner documenting architecture created for the games.

Sumner captured buildings including the Aquatics Centre by Zaha Hadid and Velodrome by Hopkins Architects plus infrastructure and the athletes’ village for two books published by Wiley: The Architecture of London 2012 by Tom Dyckhoff and Claire Barrett, and London 2012 Sustainable Design by Hattie Hartman.

See all our stories about Sumner’s photographs here.

via Edmund Sumner photographs London 2012 Olympic architecture.