Explore a New York exhibition of small-space design proposals that rethink current ideas about housing

After Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced the winner of New York City’s adAPT NYC competition at the Museum of the City of New York in late January, 2013, he toured the Making Room exhibition that opened the following day. The exhibition, organized by the museum with the Citizens Housing & Planning Council (CHPC), is subtitled New Models for Housing New Yorkers, and it explores this theme through design schemes that respond to CHPC research on the city’s shifting demographics as well as through finalists’ entries in the adAPT NYC competition, some precedents outside the city and an entire 325-square-foot apartment. This last piece received the most attention and gave the mayor some great photo ops, but as we’ll see, it is just part of the story.

 

via Explore a New York exhibition of small-space design proposals that rethink current ideas about housing.

Incredible photos from the CES vault: 1967 to 2012

The vault doesn’t lie! Wild photos from the past to the present!

In 2012, the official attendance numbers for CES – the Consumer Electronics Show – were just over 156,000, the highest ever according to the Consumer Electronics Association, the professional organization that produces CES. Behind the scenes of the massive, multi-day show held every January in Las Vegas, though, many industry insiders and media have been whispering of the “death of CES” – and large tech trade shows in general – for several years now. Less hyperbolically, the industry is certainly undergoing a lot of changes, and huge shows with dozens of major product launches can seem less important than they have in years past. Many companies have scaled back the number of products they launch each year, and often have their own launch events to maximize attention and press coverage. Over its 46 year history, however, CES’s attendance numbers have grown steeply, and this year’s CES, will likely be attended in larger numbers than ever before. As we move toward CES 2013, we decided to take a retrospective look at the history of the industry’s largest trade show. Here are some fantastic and weird photos of CES through the years.

via Incredible photos from the CES vault: 1967 to 2012 | The Verge.

DC: Urban Stories of a Changing City

  1. D.C. officials thrilled by Obama’s license-plate decision but want more /read in @feedly feedly.com/k/XxzSIx

Why Subtraction Is the Hardest Math in Product Design | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Why Subtraction Is the Hardest Math in Product Design | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Simple doesn’t just sell, it sticks. Simple made hits of the Nest thermostat, Fitbit, and TiVo. Simple brought Apple back from the dead. It’s why you have Netflix. The Fisher Space Pen, the Swiss Army Knife, and the Rolex Oyster Perpetual are some of our most enduring products. All are marvels of simplicity.

Yet while many mechanical marvels of simplicity remain true to their original form, most electronic ones do not.

Travel back in time to use your parents’ first microwave and you’ll likely see a box with three buttons (High, Medium, Low) and a timer dial. By contrast, one of LG’s current models boasts 33 buttons. Do I hit Auto Defrost or Express Defrost? And what the hell is Less/More? None of these make my popcorn pop faster or taste better. And it’s not easier to use. Why do products become more complex as they evolve?

via Why Subtraction Is the Hardest Math in Product Design | Gadget Lab | Wired.com.

DC: Urban Stories of a Changing City

  1. D.C. officials thrilled by Obama’s license-plate decision but want more /read in @feedly feedly.com/k/XxzSIx