Insane Makeup Turns Models Into 2-D Paintings Of Famous Artists

1 | Insane Makeup Turns Models Into 2-D Paintings Of Famous Artists | Co.Design | business + design

When we think of face painting, we usually think of clowns, county fairs and this turtle-loving zombie kid. We certainly tend not to respect it as an art: instead, it\’s considered a dabbling at best, the sort of medium best left to teenage girls raising money for charity during a parade by painting children’s faces.

But as Russian make-up artist Valeriya Kutsan shows, there\’s nothing trivial about face painting. The human countenance can be an unparalleled canvas, and accounting for its contours takes great skill. For proof, look no further than Kutsan\’s latest series, 2D Or Not 2D. Teamed up with photographer Alexander Khoklov and post-processing expert Veronica Ershova, Kutsan has used a breathtaking array of techniques to paint the faces of models to resemble the flat, two-dimensional works of famous 20th-century artists.

 

 


via 1 | Insane Makeup Turns Models Into 2-D Paintings Of Famous Artists | Co.Design | business + design.

An Interactive Cloud Made of 6,000 Light Bulbs | Colossal


 

 

CLOUD is a large scale interactive installation by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown that appeared September 15th as part of Nuit Blanche Calgary in Alberta, Canada. The piece is made from 1,000 working lightbulbs on pullchains and an additional 5,000 made from donated burnt out lights donated by the public. Visitors to the installation could pull the chains causing the cloud to sort of shimmer and flicker, I can’t tell you how much I would have enjoyed seeing this up close or at least on video. Did anyone film it? Learn more about it on the project website, and if you liked this also check out Wang Yuyang’s Artificial Moon. via my eclectic depiction of life

via An Interactive Cloud Made of 6,000 Light Bulbs | Colossal.

The McMillan redevelopment plan in DC

There are miles to go before ground is broken, but plans for the redevelopment of the McMillan Sand Filtration Site took a significant step forward Thursday when plans won the provisional approval of the District’s Historic Preservation Review Board.

The site, at North Capitol Street and Michigan Avenue NW, functioned as a water-filtration plant until the 1980s and has been eyed for redevelopment almost since the day it closed. The most recent effort has been underway since 2006, when a city commission selected a group of developers known as Vision McMillan Partners to begin exploring redevelopment options. Under its current arrangement with the city, VMP is now embarking on the process of preparing the land for development in exchange for the first right to purchase the land once that “entitlement” process is complete.