A champion of the open floor plan envisions a more diverse post-pandem

As a longtime designer of office spaces for big companies such as Google, Microsoft, and the advertising firm TBWA\Chiat\Day, Los Angeles-based Clive Wilkinson Architects has helped define how offices around the world look and feel. One of its biggest innovations was a push toward the open office floor plan—the big, wallless room full of clicking and chattering desk workers that optimized the square footage of offices and democratized the workplace.

But for the actual office workers using those famous open offices, the experience has been less than ideal. They’re noisy and lack privacy, they reinforce sexist behavior, and they even make people quit their jobs.

Source: A champion of the open floor plan envisions a more diverse post-pandem

3 Prolific Artist Friendships That Changed the Course of Art History

Discover the captivating stories behind a few of the art world’s most famous and enduring friendships.

In the often-solitary life of an artist, it is rare to find a trustworthy peer to take on the role of confidante. And there’s a good reason why: critique, both internal and from others, is a never-ending obsession for an artist, whose livelihood is dependent on the personal outpouring of their craft. Indeed, it takes a very special sort of friendship between artists to persist through the highs and lows of their unique lifestyles and to overcome professional jealousy, easily bruised feelings, and, at times, differing opinions on what makes good art. 

Beth Phillips, Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Francesco Clemente (1984) © Beth Phillips. Courtesy Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, Switzerland.

Source: http://bit.ly/3pGzY4O

Illuminated lines of icicles

Photograph by Ed Estes circa 2021

These maps show how the region’s population density has changed since 1970

This article was first published on July 26, 2019. It’s interesting to look back at the region’s history, so we are sharing it again. DC’s population…

These maps show how the region’s population density has changed since 1970

Louis Vuitton’s flagship Osaka store covered in curving glass sails

The facade of Louis Vuitton‘s store in Osaka, designed by architects Jun Aoki & Associates and Peter Marino, is based on the sails of old Japanese merchant ships

The Louis Vuitton Maison Osaka Midosuji stands on the busy shopping street of Shinsaibashi-suji.

Louis Vuitton's flagship Osaka store by Jun Aoki and Peter Marino

Japanese architecture firm Jun Aoki & Associates and New York architecture studio Peter Marino collaborated to design the shop.

Its facade is based on the translucent sails of traditional Higaki-Kaisen cargo ships, in reference to the city’s history as an important port.

Louis Vuitton's flagship Osaka store by Jun Aoki and Peter Marino

They filter light into the interiors during the day and create a lantern-like effect at night.

“The purity of the facade is reinforced by the use of metal fretwork motifs at ground-floor level,” said Jun Aoki & Associates.

Louis Vuitton's flagship Osaka store by Jun Aoki and Peter Marino

Inside wooden floors reference to the deck of a ship, along with with wood-clad pillars and metal ceilings “reminiscent of the spirit of a grand yacht embarking on an exciting adventure”.

Across four stories, the shop features clothes and accessories as well as historical objects from the Louis Vuitton Archives and contemporary art from the house’s Objets Nomades collection.

Read more: http://bit.ly/2VN2MgD

Legacy Award Winner Robert P. Madison Knocks Down Barriers for Minority Architects | 2020-01-14 | Engineering News-Record

Robert P. Madison fought in World War II in Italy as a proud member of the historic Buffalo Soldiers, the all-African-American unit of the U.S. Army that traces its lineage back to the Civil War. Second Lieutenant Madison was wounded in combat and received a purple heart, but when he returned to civilian life in 1946, eager to resume his education at Western Reserve University (now Case Western Reserve) in Cleveland, his application was summarily denied simply because he was black.

A few days later, Madison returned in his full dress uniform with his purple heart and, shamed and under duress, administrators grudgingly admitted him to the university even though some whispered, “you will never be an architect.”

It was one of the many times that Madison, now 96, was underestimated during a life that created social change—Madison became the first African-American architect in Ohio, only the 10th in the nation, and eventually was named president of the Cleveland chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

Source: Legacy Award Winner Robert P. Madison Knocks Down Barriers for Minority Architects | 2020-01-14