Archive for the ‘ Residential ’ Category

The 11 Most Anticipated Buildings of 2020 | Architectural Digest

Central Park Tower by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill (New York City)Designing a skyscraper in New York is an experience unlike building in nearly any other city in the world. The combination of architectural history, coupled with the sheer volume of foot traffic walking past (and flying above) buildings in the Big Apple, makes their presence a vital part of the city’s identity. So when the Chicago-based architectural firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill was tapped to design the Central Park Tower, it recognized the sky-high expectations.

Slated to be completed in 2020, Central Park Tower will be a shocking 1,549 feet tall, making it the second-tallest skyscraper in the United States and the Western Hemisphere (behind One World Trade Center), the 15th-tallest building in the world, and the tallest residential building in the world. Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, however, is no stranger to working at these heights. The firm is responsible for extending the skyline in the Middle East with such structures as the Burj Khalifa in Dubai and the Kingdom Tower in Saudi Arabia.

Yet, unlike those aforementioned locations, no matter the height, building in New York brings on a whole new host of challenges. “New York is one of the most iconic cities in the world,” says Gordon Gill, a founding member of the firm. “And much of this comes from its beautiful architecture. Understanding that and trying to design a building that will retain its own stature within that context has been a great opportunity. Contributing to New York’s skyline at that scale and becoming part of that legacy is a defining moment for any architect.

That doesn’t happen every day.” The structure consists of 179 luxury residences, while at the base, Nordstrom’s will house its seven-floor flagship store. The location, on 57th Street between Columbus Circle and the Plaza District, means occupants will have uninhibited views of Central Park to the north. In the past, travelers arrived to New York (by car and air) would be greeted by dominating structures such as the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building. Now we can add Central Park Tower to that exclusive list of buildings that stand out upon first experience.

Source: The 11 Most Anticipated Buildings of 2020 | Architectural Digest

A Mirrored Mexican Home Hides Among a Lush Fores

Covered in mirrored glass that’s transparent when viewed from within, the facade of this Mexican forest retreat reflects the color, light, and movements of its natural surroundings.

Located on a lush woodland hillside of Monterrey, Mexico, this reflective retreat—also known as Los Terrenos, meaning The Terrains—has been designed by Mexico City–based architect Tatiana Bilbao, using rammed earth, terracotta clay bricks, and mirrored glass.

www.dwell.com/article/a-mirrored-mexican-home-hides-among-a-lush-forest-2c9d86c7

11 Grocery-Anchored Developments Underway In D.C.

The developments that have the greatest impact on a neighborhood are often those that bring a new grocery store, offering a new option for residents to make their regular food shopping trips.

Building grocery stores as part of low-rise shopping centers with surface parking lots appears to be a thing of the past in the D.C. Metro area, as developers are now building grocery stores into mixed-use developments with hundreds of apartments that bring a consistent stream of demand.

 The D.C. region is lined with new grocery-anchored developments that will bring retailers such as Wegmans, Whole Foods, Aldi and Trader Joe’s to their respective neighborhoods. From Rockville to Shaw to Southeast D.C. to Alexandria, Bisnow found 11 grocery-anchored developments underway in the D.C. area.

Source: 11 Grocery-Anchored Developments Underway In D.C.

Petworth, Park View Booming With Multifamily Projects, Restaurant Openings

A growing neighborhood in Northwest D.C. that has welcomed a wave of bars and restaurants over the last year can serve as a model for other parts of the city looking to build more development and attract new retailers.

The roughly mile-long stretch of Georgia Avenue from Lamont Street to Upshur Street that includes part of the Petworth and Park View neighborhoods has at least 13 multifamily projects in various stages of development and has welcomed at least 17 new bars and restaurants since the start of 2018, plus a gym, a hair salon and a clothing store.

 The neighborhood will receive a spotlight Oct. 5 when D.C. hosts its first-ever open streets event on a 3-mile stretch of Georgia Avenue, closing the street to cars and featuring various activities for pedestrians.

People who visit the neighborhood for the event will see the new roster of restaurants and a series of construction projects underway, but with a different feel than the other fast-growing parts of the city.

Many of D.C.’s booming neighborhoods, such as NoMa and Capitol Riverfront, feature 12-story buildings that take up entire blocks with hundreds of units, but that is not the case in Petworth and Park View. The zoning classification along this stretch of Georgia Avenue only allows for buildings up to 65 feet tall.

Source: Petworth, Park View Booming With Multifamily Projects, Restaurant Openings

You can now buy one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most iconic houses

After an extensive restoration, Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Ennis House in Southern California is on sale for $23 million. It may seem like a lot, but it’s nothing for a classic included in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Built in 1924, the temple-like home rises on a 36,000-square-foot plot in Los Feliz, one of the prettiest neighborhoods of Los Angeles, full of beautiful ravines, hills, and forests.

 

Source: You can now buy one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most iconic houses

An Interview With the Architect of DC’s Shipping Container Apartments

DC-based Travis Price recently made headlines for being the architect behind the shipping container apartments that popped up in northeast DC last month. But the architect has long had an outside-the-box philosophy when it comes to architectural design, and in DC, that started in Forest Hills where the homes he designed, including his own, stand out among the neighborhood’s brick colonials. UrbanTurf recently chatted with the poetic Price about the state of DC architecture, the trend of super-small living and this idea he has for floating homes on the Potomac.

via An Interview With the Architect of DC’s Shipping Container Apartments.

Photograph of the Day!