Archive for the ‘ Public Art ’ Category

The Fraught History Of America’s Most Pervasive Brand

A very difficult yet poignant history to tell particularly during these times of high level discrimination in our government and society.  How does a Nation of people remain calm under the humiliation of the white man I just do not know. Peace and humility has got to be the only answer! God Bless the American Indian! -Ed Estes

They’re on baking powder boxes, break fluid containers, and cigar boxes. They’re featured in logos for companies that sell refrigerator compressors and canned peas. They adorn bubble gum boxes and Kanye West T-shirts. There are classy motorcycles and deadly missiles named for them. They’ve become mascots for sports teams both large and small.

Images of American Indians are everywhere in modern American life. That ubiquity is the subject of a new exhibition called Americans at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., and an online version of the show. With almost 350 artifacts that stretch across three centuries of history, the show has a poignant message: Though imagery featuring Indians is deeply embedded in American life, many of us scarcely notice it’s there. The exhibition is designed to help you look, but it also reveals how images of Indians, as conceived by white Americans, have become a branding tool in a culture that has systematically oppressed those same Indians.

 

American culture has used imagery of American Indians to symbolize authenticity in branding, or combativeness in sports and the military, even as it has subjugated real-life Indians throughout history. At its core, the artifacts in the exhibition reveal how Indians have become an integral part of the American brand itself–something that companies have been capitalizing on for decades.

“You brand yourself to add value to the product,” says Paul Chaat Smith, the exhibition’s curator. “What is the value that it adds? It’s integrity, authenticity, and a certain kind of Americanness. It’s what’s special about the U.S.”

Source: The Fraught History Of America’s Most Pervasive Brand

The Winning Design for DC’s 11th Street Bridge Park

 

On Thursday morning, the design jury for the highly-anticipated DC park will announce that the winning proposal comes from the team of OLIN, OMA and Arup.Plans have been in the works for over a year to turn three concrete piers into one elevated park connecting Anacostia and Navy Yard. The goal of the project is to create a connecting design with an appeal similar to that of the Providence River Bridge park in Rhode Island, although many compare the planned park to the High Line in New York City.

via The Winning Design for DC’s 11th Street Bridge Park.

ICD ITKE Research Pavilion 2014

ICD ITKE Research Pavilion 2014 « Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

The Institute for Computational Design ICD and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design ITKE of the University of Stuttgart designed and built a robotically woven carbon fiber pavilion whose structure was inspired by beetles. Continuing the tradition of building a new pavilion each year, ICD and ITKE’s design explores the limits of biomimetic design, lightweight shells, and robotic fabrication.

via ICD ITKE Research Pavilion 2014 « Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Lighting a dragon: a bridge to prosperity!

A big hand has to go out to  Philips! The port of Da Nang has grown in prosperity since Philips LEDs began lighting up the Dragon Bridge. See how the lives of fisherman Le Van Khe and his daughter Le Thi Vinh are improving.

A beautiful and exciting design for a destination in an urban city. The design and installation attracts both tourist and locals alike, as well as, boosting the local economy and influencing unique entrepreneur opportunities. An amazing an wonderful story. Hopefully, the proposed 11th Street Bridge Park project can be as dynamic and rewarding for the local community in Washington, DC.!

Altered Architecture: 12 More Abandoned Buildings as Art | Urbanist

Abandoned places are brightened up, made even creepier and more atmospheric, or otherwise transformed into massive works of art with installations that use entire buildings as creative tools. Whether calling attention to blight in urban areas or making use of a structure before it’s demolished, these 12 more! abandoned building art projects make already-fascinating spaces even more of a visual delight

via Altered Architecture: 12 More Abandoned Buildings as Art | Urbanist.

An Interactive Cloud Made of 6,000 Light Bulbs | Colossal


 

 

CLOUD is a large scale interactive installation by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown that appeared September 15th as part of Nuit Blanche Calgary in Alberta, Canada. The piece is made from 1,000 working lightbulbs on pullchains and an additional 5,000 made from donated burnt out lights donated by the public. Visitors to the installation could pull the chains causing the cloud to sort of shimmer and flicker, I can’t tell you how much I would have enjoyed seeing this up close or at least on video. Did anyone film it? Learn more about it on the project website, and if you liked this also check out Wang Yuyang’s Artificial Moon. via my eclectic depiction of life

via An Interactive Cloud Made of 6,000 Light Bulbs | Colossal.

11th Street Bridge Park Concept Sketches praised