Posts Tagged ‘ Architecture ’

You can now buy one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most iconic houses

After an extensive restoration, Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Ennis House in Southern California is on sale for $23 million. It may seem like a lot, but it’s nothing for a classic included in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Built in 1924, the temple-like home rises on a 36,000-square-foot plot in Los Feliz, one of the prettiest neighborhoods of Los Angeles, full of beautiful ravines, hills, and forests.

 

Source: You can now buy one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most iconic houses

Awesome Fly-Through: The New Atlanta Stadium

Photograph of the Day!

London unveils plans for the future of the Olympic Park | SmartPlanet

“The doom and gloom merchants who said our great city would implode as we tried to stage the greatest show on earth have been proved wrong,” said Johnson. “And they will be proved wrong again as we use the catalyst of the games to attract investment into the wealth of opportunities arising in London now and in the coming years. Put simply there is no other place on the planet where investors will see greater returns.” 

For London, how to deal with the new buildings and modifications made for the Games could be more complicated. Plans for the legacy of the Olympic Park (to be named Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park) were recently unveiled by London mayor Boris Johnson, highlighting how exactly the city hopes to continue to use the park to the benefit of its citizens and not serve as a reminder of wasted resources. It’s a tricky thing to do, when something is so purpose built.

via London unveils plans for the future of the Olympic Park | SmartPlanet.

Edmund Sumner photographs London 2012 Olympic architecture

I am following much of the Summer Games in London but I am mostly impressed with some of the exciting and beautiful architecture that has been created to house the many sporting events and the Olympic Village housing the athletes.

Check out how architecture has set the tone for the drama and beauty that backdrops the human spirit and athleticism of this years Summer Games in London.

Ahead of the London 2012 Olympics opening on Friday, here’s a slideshow of images from photographer Edmund Sumner documenting architecture created for the games.

Sumner captured buildings including the Aquatics Centre by Zaha Hadid and Velodrome by Hopkins Architects plus infrastructure and the athletes’ village for two books published by Wiley: The Architecture of London 2012 by Tom Dyckhoff and Claire Barrett, and London 2012 Sustainable Design by Hattie Hartman.

See all our stories about Sumner’s photographs here.

via Edmund Sumner photographs London 2012 Olympic architecture.

Is Your City Design-Centered or Place-Centered? « Project for Public Spaces – Placemaking for Communities

To move toward an Architecture of Place, we must all advocate for our cities to take a Place-Centered approach to creating new buildings and public spaces. 

When an opportunity to develop a site in your city comes up, what kind of approach do the people leading the process take? Do they treat the site as an independent piece of real estate, to be interpreted by architects and planners first before involving any of the local residents? Or do they reach out to people to find out what needs already exist in the area around that site, and then begin devising a plan with the community?

We call the former of these two a Design-Centered approach, and the latter a Place-Centered approach. One of our 11 Placemaking Principles is that it is critical to remember, in any project, that you are creating a place, not a design. While good design is important to creating great places, it is but one tool in your kit–not the driving force behind good Placemaking. When a community is involved from (or even before) the start of a design process, that process serves the site and the people who will use it, instead of serving the designers’ own interests. This creates places that are accessible, dynamic, and inclusive–the kind of places that are central to building strong neighborhoods and cities.

via Is Your City Design-Centered or Place-Centered? « Project for Public Spaces – Placemaking for Communities.

TheWashCycle: 11th Street Recreation Bridge

One of the illustrations of the 11th Street Bridge by Ed Estes, has received a lot of attention and is being blogged on several popular sites in Washington, DC. Ed’s conceptual designs and illustrations are part of the 11th Street Recreation Bridge Potential Study published by the DC Office of Planning.

I called it! Sort of. Back in 2009 when DDOT held a presser to start work on the 11th Street Bridge I wrote When I asked about the upstream span and the possibility of repurposing it, I was told that DDOT had not ruled that out yet. That would be a great idea. DC would save the cost of demolition and could put that towards maintenance – which would be less without car traffic. Then they could give it the High Line treatment, creating a space with plantings, art etc.. And cyclists could use that part too.

via TheWashCycle: 11th Street Recreation Bridge.