Posts Tagged ‘ NYC ’

The 11 Most Anticipated Buildings of 2020 | Architectural Digest

Central Park Tower by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill (New York City)Designing a skyscraper in New York is an experience unlike building in nearly any other city in the world. The combination of architectural history, coupled with the sheer volume of foot traffic walking past (and flying above) buildings in the Big Apple, makes their presence a vital part of the city’s identity. So when the Chicago-based architectural firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill was tapped to design the Central Park Tower, it recognized the sky-high expectations.

Slated to be completed in 2020, Central Park Tower will be a shocking 1,549 feet tall, making it the second-tallest skyscraper in the United States and the Western Hemisphere (behind One World Trade Center), the 15th-tallest building in the world, and the tallest residential building in the world. Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, however, is no stranger to working at these heights. The firm is responsible for extending the skyline in the Middle East with such structures as the Burj Khalifa in Dubai and the Kingdom Tower in Saudi Arabia.

Yet, unlike those aforementioned locations, no matter the height, building in New York brings on a whole new host of challenges. “New York is one of the most iconic cities in the world,” says Gordon Gill, a founding member of the firm. “And much of this comes from its beautiful architecture. Understanding that and trying to design a building that will retain its own stature within that context has been a great opportunity. Contributing to New York’s skyline at that scale and becoming part of that legacy is a defining moment for any architect.

That doesn’t happen every day.” The structure consists of 179 luxury residences, while at the base, Nordstrom’s will house its seven-floor flagship store. The location, on 57th Street between Columbus Circle and the Plaza District, means occupants will have uninhibited views of Central Park to the north. In the past, travelers arrived to New York (by car and air) would be greeted by dominating structures such as the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building. Now we can add Central Park Tower to that exclusive list of buildings that stand out upon first experience.

Source: The 11 Most Anticipated Buildings of 2020 | Architectural Digest

Zaha Hadid’s Apartment Block Overlooking NYC High Line

A glittering glass apartment block with volumes flowing into each other in dynamic stacked arrangements will be architect Zaha Hadid’s first building in New York City. Set to overlook the second section of the High Line, the city’s elevated park, the 11-story sculpted glass and steel development aims to draw in luxury buyers with a double-height lobby, private courtyards, a communal garden and residences measuring up to 5,500 square feet.

via Zaha Hadid’s Apartment Block Overlooking NYC High Line | WebUrbanist.

One World Trade Center in New York tops out

One World Trade Center in New York has topped out with the addition of a 124-meter steel spire.

The spire, which will serve as a broadcast antenna, takes the skyscraper’s height to 541 metres, or 1776 feet – a number commemorating the year of America’s independence.

One World Trade Center is now the tallest structure in the country and the third-tallest in the world, although there is debate over whether the spire, installed last Friday, is actually a removable antenna – a vital distinction in measuring buildings.

Built at a cost of $3.9 billion, the tower also has the distinction of being the most expensive office building in the world.

via One World Trade Center in New York tops out.

Harlem’s New Renaissance

 

 

For much of the 20th century, private developers ignored Harlem, deterred by its high crime rate, profusion of subsidized housing, and long trek from Midtown. During the malaise of the 1970s, the city owned well over half of the real estate in this storied neighborhood, long regarded as the nation’s black cultural capital.

via Harlem’s New Renaissance| News | Architectural Record.